Holy Ground: Cathedrals in the twenty-first century

by Stephen Platten (editor), Frank Field MP (foreword), (author), et al.

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Book Details

Rating: unrated

Format: Paperback (198 pages)

Publisher: Sacristy Press

Date of Publication:

ISBN: 978-1-910519-73-8

Permission must be requested to reuse any content from this book.

Synopsis

Cathedrals today face a paradox: on the one hand they represent one of the biggest success stories and mission opportunities of the present-day church; on the other they face seemingly insurmountable financial difficulties, and are largely left by the church and government to fend for themselves.

Many—both within and outside the church—argue that cathedrals are an irrelevance. But cathedrals are one area of the church’s life where increasingly the unchurched and the half-believer encounter God, and where the institutions of our society instinctively engage with the Christian gospel, making them truly missional in their occupation of a spiritually liminal space.

Holy Ground digs deep into the life of England’s cathedrals, and discusses such diverse topics as finance, growth, heritage, liturgy, development, music and art.

English cathedrals are a rare success story in modern religion. While attendance at most places of worship is in decline, cathedral worship is rising. People clearly find in these sensational buildings something the responds to their religious,emotional and psychological needs. Is it their worship, their architecture, their music, their governance, their serenity? At last a group of informed writers tackle questions crucial to the future of religion in Britain, and perhaps of the wider human condition.

— Simon Jenkins, Author of England’s Cathedrals

About the Authors

Stephen Platten (editor) is an Assistant Bishop in the Dioceses of London, Southwark, and Newcastle, and chairman of Hymns Ancient and Modern and of the governors of the Anglican Centre in Rome. He was formerly the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Secretary for Ecumenical Affairs, Dean of Norwich, and Bishop of Wakefield. He was a member of the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England from 2006 to 2016.

Peter Atkinson has been Dean of Worcester since 2007, having previously been a residentiary canon of Chichester, Principal of Chichester Theological College, and a parish priest in south London, Surrey, Bath, and Sussex. He is the author of two books, Friendship and the Body of Christ (2004) and The Lion Encyclopaedia of the Bible (2009).

Frank Field has been the Labour MP for Birkenhead since 1979. He chaired the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England from 2005 to 2015 and founded the Cathedral Academies Trust in 2016.

Nicholas Henshall has been Dean of Chelmsford since 2014. He served as a parish priest for fourteen years in inner-city Newcastle, followed by six years as Canon Precentor of Derby Cathedral, and five as vicar of Christ Church, Harrogate. He worked for BBC local radio for six years and writes regularly for the Roman Catholic international weekly, The Tablet.

David Hoyle has been Dean of Bristol since 2010. Before that he had been a parish priest and more recently Canon Residentiary of Gloucester Cathedral and Secretary to the Theological Group of the House of Bishops. He is a published historian and the author of The Pattern of Our Calling (2016).

Christopher Irvine is Canon Librarian and Director of Education at Canterbury Cathedral, and was formerly the Principal of the College of the Resurrection, Mirfield. He is a trustee of Art and Christianity Enquiry, and continues to teach Liturgical Studies. His previous publications include The Use of Symbols in Worship (2007) and The Cross and Creation in Christian Liturgy and Art (2013).

Jane Kennedy is architect to Ely, Newcastle, and Christ Church (Oxford) cathedrals and is also working with several Roman Catholic cathedrals. She is a senior partner at Purcell and is currently leading a team which is repairing, adapting, and extending Auckland Castle in County Durham to be a museum of faith.

Simon Oliver is Van Mildert Professor of Divinity at Durham University and Residentiary Canon of Durham Cathedral, having been on the faculty at Lampeter and then Associate Professor in the University of Nottingham. He specializes in systematic theology and philosophy. His most recent book is Creation: A Guide for the Perplexed (2017).

Jennie Page was for ten years (2006–2016) Vice Chair of the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England, having been Chief Executive of English Heritage from 1989 to 1995. She is currently Vice Chair of the Church Buildings Council.

Richard Shephard was a member of Baroness Howe’s Cathedrals Commission, whose report formed the basis of the 1999 Cathedrals Measure. Most recently he has been Director of the York Minster Trust and before that was Headmaster of the Minster School in York. He is a prolific composer of sacred music.

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